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Building Emotional Resilience

Image of a young person courtesy of Place2BeHow do you deal with problems? What happens inside when you can’t get what you want? How do you behave when something has gone wrong?


The answers to those questions determine your level of emotional resilience. Seeing problems as creative opportunities, taking a deep breath and starting again when you have failed the first (or second) time, and not taking anger out on yourself and others indicates strong emotional resilience.

It’s more than the absence of mental illness. It is mental health, and it is vital!

Underpins healthy people and society

Emotional resilience is the foundation upon which all success is based, including doing well at school, being able to get employment, having positive relationships with family and peers and achieving one’s potential.

Children in disrupted families, where parents have no educational qualifications, and in poorer families in disadvantaged areas, are more likely to have mental health problems. Building their emotional health will not only allow them to be happier and more fulfilled, it will also help raise their educational attainment. This can make society more equal and save on dealing with troubled later lives.

What should we do?

Help children to get:

  • plenty of physical activity and chances to play
  • excellent nutrition and plenty of rest
  • to learn self awareness and self management techniques
  • buddies, peer mediation, mentors and other ‘peer support programmes’
  • to give those who disrupt school, truant, or bully not just punishment – but also opportunities to be listened to, to have talking therapies, and to be referred appropriately to mental health services.

We are calling on government to invest in the places where children can build emotional resilience: to train teachers and others who come into contact with children in providing this support and how to target the help early on.

Image of a young person courtesy of Place2BeHow do you deal with problems? What happens inside when you can’t get what you want? How do you behave when something has gone wrong?


The answers to those questions determine your level of emotional resilience. Seeing problems as creative opportunities, taking a deep breath and starting again when you have failed the first (or second) time, and not taking anger out on yourself and others indicates strong emotional resilience.

It’s more than the absence of mental illness. It is mental health, and it is vital!

Underpins healthy people and society

Emotional resilience is the foundation upon which all success is based, including doing well at school, being able to get employment, having positive relationships with family and peers and achieving one’s potential.

Children in disrupted families, where parents have no educational qualifications, and in poorer families in disadvantaged areas, are more likely to have mental health problems. Building their emotional health will not only allow them to be happier and more fulfilled, it will also help raise their educational attainment. This can make society more equal and save on dealing with troubled later lives.

What should we do?

Help children to get:

  • plenty of physical activity and chances to play
  • excellent nutrition and plenty of rest
  • to learn self awareness and self management techniques
  • buddies, peer mediation, mentors and other ‘peer support programmes’
  • to give those who disrupt school, truant, or bully not just punishment – but also opportunities to be listened to, to have talking therapies, and to be referred appropriately to mental health services.

We are calling on government to invest in the places where children can build emotional resilience: to train teachers and others who come into contact with children in providing this support and how to target the help early on.